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October 29, 2007

Yanks Make Offer To Girardi, Mattingly May Be Gone

From ESPN.com -

The Yankees officially offered their managerial job to Joe Girardi on Monday morning and he is expected to accept it, a source has told 1050 ESPN New York's Andrew Marchand.

"The Yankees have offered Joe the opportunity to become their next manager. Discussions are ongoing." Steve Mandell, Girardi's agent, said. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman told Don Mattingly and Tony Pena that they will not be getting the job.

Girardi was in Denver for the World Series. A source said he is expected to fly to New York for the announcement, which is likely to come Tuesday. Girardi's contract is expected to be in the three-year, $6 million range.

Mattingly will not accept a position on the Yankees coaching staff, Marchand and ESPN The Magazine's Buster Olney are reporting.

Here's where it gets interesting: Gary Tuck was Girardi's bench coach in Florida. Now, Tuck is the bullpen coach for the Red Sox. If Mattingly leaves, and Girardi wants Tuck to be the bench coach in New York, it could be a tactical plus for the Yankees - in that Tuck would have some insight on the Red Sox personnel.

Don't be shocked by a return of Bobby Meacham either - as he was with Joe in Florida as well. Meacham has logged a long time in the game as a coach. He could be a good addition to the staff too - if Larry Bowa does leave the team.

Posted by Steve Lombardi at October 29, 2007 12:56 PM

Comments

Great.

Perhaps Hughes, Chaimberlain and Kennedy can contact Ricky Nolasco, Josh Johnson and Anibel Sanchez now to find out what orthapedic surgeon they recommend.

Posted by: Eric [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 01:32 PM

>> Great.

Perhaps Hughes, Chaimberlain and Kennedy can contact Ricky Nolasco, Josh Johnson and Anibel Sanchez now to find out what orthapedic surgeon they recommend. >>

Cashman will be on top of it, don't you worry your pretty little Girardi-hating head about it.

Posted by: Pete [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 01:38 PM

I don't know about that, Eric. Is 136 innings in 2005 to 200 innings in 2006 too big of an increase? (I ask because I don't know.) That was Sanchez's totals in 2005 and 2006 in the minors and the majors.

Nolasco pitched 161 innings in the minors in 2005, then 140 innings in the majors in 2006.

Johnson pitched 151 innings in the minors in 2005, then 157 innings in the majors in 2006. Six innings is definitely not too big of an increase - if anything, the Marlins' minor league coaches should be taken to task for allowing a 21 year old to throw so many innings in the minors.

It doesn't seem as if Girardi is that insensitive to his pitchers' workloads. Anyone have his stats on Pitcher Abuse Points?

Posted by: Chuck May [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 01:43 PM

Anibal Sanchez: 114.3 IP in 2006
Ricky Nolasco: 140.0 IP in 2006
Josh Johnson: 157.0 IP in 2006

Any injuries they sustained which required surgery are just as likely to have occured under a different manager or might've been pre-existing conditions. Those workloads don't look that extreme to me to warrant implying that Girardi overused them.

I just checked their pitch count for every single game they pitched under Girardi in 2006. None ever topped 114 and seemed to reside right around the 80-105 area. Seems like regular usage to me.

Posted by: MJ [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 01:46 PM

Cashman will be on top of it, don't you worry your pretty little Girardi-hating head about it.
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Pete is right about that. The Yankees aren't stupid. If they imposed "Joba Rules" on Torre, they certainly will impose rules on a young manager like Girardi.

Posted by: jonm [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 01:54 PM

It's pretty sad that Donnie's time with the organization is over. I don't think Cashman should have hired him just because of who he was or anything. I'm not saying that. It's just too bad his time with the team is ending like this, on a bitter note of disappointment (for him).

I'm not big into hero worship, but Donnie is someone I liked on an almost personal level. The Yankees implied all along that he was going to be the manager one day. It's the only reason he came out of retirement. I suppose he has a right to be angry, and has a right to turn his back on them.

I think, long term, this is a blow to the team. Just because Donnie is someone you always want within the fold, and it's pretty obvious now he's going to move on to another organization.

They couldn't give him the manager's job just to keep him around, but it's sad all the same to see him go.

Posted by: baileywalk [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 03:06 PM

>> Just because Donnie is someone you always want within the fold, and it's pretty obvious now he's going to move on to another organization. >>

This is the part I don't get - was there any obvious benefit, other than for the fans, to having him sitting on that bench?

Maybe he's just one of those guys who better served the organization as a *player*. It happens sometimes, you know.

Posted by: Pete [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 03:18 PM

This is the part I don't get - was there any obvious benefit, other than for the fans, to having him sitting on that bench?
----

Well, the benefit, as it was once believed, is that he would succeed Torre as manager. Whatever happened behind the scenes changed that thought. They had a chance to grab Girardi and they took it. But four years ago they definitely asked him to come back with the idea that he would be the next manager -- someone clearly thought he was up for it.

I think the implication that Donnie was the benchcoach to give the fans something to cheer about is a little belittling to Donnie. I'm not saying you're doing this, but some people seem to imply Donnie is a dullard of some sort. He knows more about baseball than every fan of the team and writer of the team could ever forget. The guy just lives and breathes the game -- I think that's a good quality for a manager.

In any event, he's gone, and that's sad. If there was any ex-player I wouldn't want to lose, it's him.

Posted by: baileywalk [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 03:29 PM

>> But four years ago they definitely asked him to come back with the idea that he would be the next manager -- someone clearly thought he was up for it. >>

This was a total George move, and you & I *both* know George is all about putting asses in the seats. Indeed, Donnie knows more about baseball than a lot of folks, but maybe management wasn't all that impressed with his time on the bench and as the hitting coach.

I hate to say it, but they probably passed on him for the same perceived reason that they took the hardline with Torre.

Posted by: Pete [TypeKey Profile Page] at October 29, 2007 04:03 PM