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March 12, 2007

The Pride and the Pressure Excerpt

The Post is featuring an excerpt of The Pride and the Pressure — A Season Inside the New York Yankee Fishbowl by Michael Morrissey. Click here to see it on-line via the Post.

In what was shared, this part really caught my eye:

In many ways, Pavano was the egg on Cashman's face. The GM had taken over in 1998, traded for Chuck Knoblauch, and promptly won three straight World Series titles. But he wasn't a scout; his background was as an administrator, a person who was supposed to delegate authority and process information. Either the Yankee scouts had been duped on Pavano's makeup issues or Cashman (and Torre) had failed to consider them or had ignored them. Either way, they were paying the price. The Yankees' recent record with bringing in pitching from outside organizations was pockmarked with disappointments.

I said this two months ago. It's nice to know that I'm not the only person who feels this way.

Posted by Steve Lombardi at March 12, 2007 10:20 AM

Comments

Who did the Cone for Key trade, was that pre-Cashman?

A poor recent record needs to be balanced by a (IMO) good earlier record: Cone, Wells, Clemens (well, that one was a no-brainer); baseball is so variable that over time, if you're lucky a couple of years, that'll be balanced by a couple of unlucky years.

Still, I think better scouting would help.

Posted by: rbj [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 11:09 AM

Cone was never traded for Key.

Key signed as a FA after the 92 season, Cone was acquired from the Royals (where he signed after the 1992 season) for the 1995 stretch drive. They both were on the 1992 World Champion Blue Jays.

As for Pavano, scouts or no, his track record was there for everyone to see. His "makeup" issues (assuming they're talking about his supposed lack of desire to pitch in NY) are overblown; he's injury prone. Always has been, whether he was with the Sox, the Expos, the Marlins, or the Yanks.

Posted by: Raf [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 11:20 AM

My "makeup" comment was directed more to the Post article, not to you, rbj...

Posted by: Raf [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 11:22 AM

Off Topic - On the Spot Reporting from Spring Training - Caught 4 games Wed. through Sunday. Some observations in a very random dump... Andy looked sharp, especially his breaking and off speed stuff. Fastball looked ordinary. Mo was sharp, Rasner and Karsten looked good and Farns dominated in the one inning he pitched. Rico saved several bad throws at first. Jorge's driving the ball, and just missed a couple of dingers, hitting into a stout wind. Tabada got his first dinger...opposite field laser beam. Hugh's got knocked around pretty good. His hook looked very sharp at times, and when he got it over it was nearly unhitable, but there were several hard hit balls off his fastball. He threw a lot of pitches and got in a good work out. Cleveland has some guys that can swing the bat. Igi didn't dominate against Pittsburg in Bradenton on Sat., but was one strike away from 3 shutout innings before giving up a monster homer. He struck out 3 or 4, including LaRoche twice. Basik (sp?) looked sharp in the infield at several positions. A-Rod hit a number of balls on the screws. Ran threw a hold sign from Bowa on Wed. night and was out by 10 feet. Saw A-Rod throw one away, and boot another, but it was a smash. Cano’s bat looks very sharp. Everyone is talking about Damon having added a few pounds. Not really noticeable. However, Robbie’s lower body looks to be headed in the Tony Gwynn direction. Someone better get after him. Jeter looks to be in mid-season form at the plate and in the field. Eric Duncan may have earned himself an extra week with the big boys after his late inning homer in Bradenton. The Pavano saga continues. Speculation at Legends Field was they had pulled him from his scheduled start because a trade was in the mix...only to find out his girlfriend had a medical issue. Sad to say, but for his sake I hope she was really, really ill, in terms of how his teammates will look at it. He better have a good outing against Boston. In 4 games, I saw 2 wins, a loss and a tie. Both the loss and the tie ended with young Yankees looking at strike three with the winning/tying runs in scoring position.

Posted by: #15 [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 11:33 AM

Thanks Raf. For some reason I had it in my head that the Yanks and Orioles traded Cone & Key. Not sure where it came from.

Posted by: rbj [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 12:07 PM

~~~Rico saved several bad throws at first. ~~~

Now, wasn't it easier to type Rico! :-)

Posted by: Steve Lombardi [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 12:59 PM

Thanks Raf. For some reason I had it in my head that the Yanks and Orioles traded Cone & Key. Not sure where it came from.
==================
Key did leave NY for the O's; I remember he had a big 1st half with them in 1997. Cone almost went to the O's, but re-upped with the Yanks. He eventually left for Boston.

I enjoyed watching them pitch.

Posted by: Raf [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 02:06 PM

~~The Yankees' recent record with bringing in pitching from outside organizations was pockmarked with disappointments.~~

You could take that statement and instead of "Yankees" substitute the name of any major league team. The problem isn't the Yankees' poor judgment; it's the need to acquire pitchers from other organizations. To have a good staff, you have to develop your own pitchers these days.

Posted by: jonm [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 03:01 PM

Actually, I've always read that it's the other way around - because pitchers take so long to ripen, etc.

The way I've seen it pitched is: develop position players and then trade for or buy your (proven) pitchers.

It does seem to make more sense that way - in terms of ROI, given that Q-marks around young pitching and pitching propects, etc.

Posted by: Steve Lombardi [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 03:37 PM

~~The way I've seen it pitched is: develop position players and then trade for or buy your (proven) pitchers.~~

I might buy this if you could name any veteran (proven) pitchers outside of Schilling and Chris Carpenter who have changed clubs since 2000 and who have been good for their new team. Teams re-sign those guys now or refuse to trade them. The free agents who are available are overpriced and get hurt and the guys who are available in trade usually have terrible contracts.

Also, I think that the idea that pitchers necessarily need more development time has become outdated. Teams like the Tigers are skipping AAA with their best prospects.

Posted by: jonm [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 12, 2007 03:54 PM

I might buy this if you could name any veteran (proven) pitchers outside of Schilling and Chris Carpenter who have changed clubs since 2000 and who have been good for their new team
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Define "good." David Wells? Bartolo Colon? Pettitte? Clemens? Derek Lowe?

Posted by: Raf [TypeKey Profile Page] at March 13, 2007 10:10 AM